Swift soars with new album ‘Lover’

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You could call me a “Lover” of Taylor Swift’s new album, released on Aug. 23, 2019. Once again, Swift has curated an amazing album after her surprising, yet successful, release and tour for her previous album “Reputation” in 2017.

Unlike most fans and critics who were disappointed with “Lover” singles, I enjoyed “ME!” and “You Need to Calm Down.” I followed the countdown to the album’s full release and was excited for what the full album would bring.

Swift’s new album is reminiscent of her work previous to “Reputation,” which was a never before seen edgy version of Swift. “Lover” returns Swift to her sweetheart days of “Sparks Fly” and the studio albums “Red” and “1989,” with many upbeat pop hits and a few country-esque ballads.

The pastel album cover reflects this change from the harsh white, black and red cover of “Reputation.” Fans of Swift, or “Swifties,” like myself, began to notice the change starting in early February with Swift’s new colorful Instagram aesthetic that led to her eventual album announcement in June.

According to a Billboard article by Jason Lipshutz, Swift said this album is an attempt to be “‘defined by the things that I love — not the things that I hate, not the things I’m afraid of.’” I think she achieves this goal through the marketing of the album with its cover art, title and the numerous feel-good songs about love and past love, opposed to the “Reputation” focus on revenge.

While “Lover” was a return to Swift’s image as a girl next door, her musical evolution in “Reputation” was not forgotten. Her inclusion of electronic dance music that has become popular in today’s  music, and first appeared on “Reputation,” is included in many of the songs on this new album.

“Lover” contains two collaborations: “Soon You’ll Get Better” with the Dixie Chicks and “ME!” with Panic! at the Disco’s Brendon Urie. These two songs and their collaborators demonstrate Swift’s both past and present, as Swift has fully made the transition from country to pop singer.

Two of the songs on the album reflect Swift’s recent efforts in supporting the Equality Act. In “You Need to Calm Down” and “The Man,” Swift comments on the political climate surrounding LGBTQ+ and women’s rights. While some critique Swift for being vocal about her political opinions as a celebrity, it’s easy to be a fan of both of these songs, as they are enjoyable and upbeat.

My personal favorites are “Paper Rings,” “I Forgot That You Existed,” and “I Think He Knows.” They are catchy songs that are refreshing to hear after the dark and twisty hits of “Reputation.”

The beauty of Swift’s newest album is its ability to merge both of her new and old styles of music, leaving everyone with something to like, while still providing a new phase of the Swift evolution.

While I enjoyed “Reputation,” it was good to hear Swift return to her roots. I thoroughly enjoyed all 18 tracks of “Lover” and am impatiently waiting Swift’s likely soon-to-be announced “Lover” tour.

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