MAJOR CONCERT

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MAJOR CONCERT

Hoodie Allen and his band fling water at the crowd from their water bottles in Shafer Auditorium on March 5, 2016.

Hoodie Allen and his band fling water at the crowd from their water bottles in Shafer Auditorium on March 5, 2016.

Hoodie Allen and his band fling water at the crowd from their water bottles in Shafer Auditorium on March 5, 2016.

Hoodie Allen and his band fling water at the crowd from their water bottles in Shafer Auditorium on March 5, 2016.

Angela Mauroni and Christina Bryson

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YONAS

The Campus: How did you get into music?

Yonas: I’ve actually always been involved in music in some fashion. My mom put me in violin classes so I played violin for like nine years. And then I discovered sports and I was like, forget this violin thing. And then just kind of being a fan of hip hop music and being in New York City where you go out to house parties and there’ll be freestyle ciphers and just kind of being in that culture.

Campus: Is there anyone in particular that you look up to professionally?

Yonas: I love what Akon has done, because on the low, that guy was like responsible for Lady Gaga and just a plethora of artists, and what he’s been able to do for himself, coming from the community that he comes from. So I would say I like Akon, Dr. Dre, Timbaland, people like that, who outside of hip hop have made an impact, just globally.

Campus: Does traveling all the time take a toll on you?

Yonas: It definitely does, especially when you go out and party like I do. The traveling is like one aspect, and then waking up hung over is another. I don’t know why I do it to myself to be honest with you, but it’s worth it. It’s fun. I enjoy visiting cities and experiencing new places, so it’s cool.

Campus: Any thoughts on the presidential campaign?

Yonas: I could be very long-winded with that one. I just think the country is in a really interesting place right now. And even more so than Obama’s election, his initial election into office in 2008, I think this is the election that’s going to shape our country for the next like 25 years. You know the debt we have is like insurmountable. Climbing out of that is going to be an interesting trick.

I don’t think Donald Trump is the answer. Especially overseas too, I think the reputation of America is kind of in jeopardy in my opinion. And we just need to come together as a country and make the right decision, and it takes everyone’s contribution. And I just hope we get it right, because if we don’t get it right we’re in some serious trouble. That was the short-winded answer.

Campus: Do you have any pre-show rituals?

Yonas: Yeah, three shots of Bombay Sapphire, specifically. Before every show, knock the edge off, and just go out there and have fun.

Campus: Do you still get nervous before you perform?

Yonas: Always, absolutely, but it’s like a good nervous. But it just shows you care about the performance and about people receiving it well. I think if I were to lose those nerves, it would mean that I was either jaded, or less passionate.

DAYA

The Campus: Is it hard touring around while you’re in school?

Daya: I’m actually not going full time so I’m not physically there. But they’re letting me take this course externally. I just need one more credit to graduate and so I’m just taking this English class online.

Campus: What’s your favorite song on the radio now?

Daya: Right now I’d have to say “Pillowtalk” by Zane. I love that song.

Campus: Who do you look up to personally?

Daya: Probably my parents because they’ve just taught me so much. They’ve been the ones keeping me grounded and taking me to lessons early on and encouraging me to go after what I want to do in life. They’re really cool and supportive.

Campus: Have you performed on college campuses before?

Daya: No I’ve done a couple more performances in the last few weeks, but this is the first one that’s close to home. This is the first big one.

Campus: Do you want to go to college?

Daya: I would love to. I definitely want to get a college degree in the future. Next year I basically won’t be going but I am applying so I’ll probably defer to colleges if I get in.

It’s hard because I don’t know what I want to study with all this going on.

Campus: Anywhere you want to travel that you haven’t yet?

Daya: I would like to go to Australia. I’ve done some traveling with my family before, and Australia my song just went top 5 on itunes so I think I have a pretty big fan base there.

HOODIE ALLEN

The Campus: Do you know where you would want to see yourself in five years?

Hoodie Allen: For me it’s just really been about doing this for as long as I want to. I think that whether at one point in time if I decide to stop…touring, I’d still be very involved in writing music for myself and other people. As of right now I still see myself doing this in five years. Maybe not colleges, who knows, might be too old for that then. But, yeah, just playing shows in general.

Campus: If you didn’t go into music what would you want to be doing?

Hoodie: It’s hard to say. I started working in tech when I got out of college. I was working at Google. So maybe something in San Francisco, like Silicon Valley sort of thing. Or working in entertainment in a different facet.

Campus: What’s your favorite song ever?

Hoodie: Favorite song ever! Of all time? Geez. It’s hard to pick one. “Drive” by Incubus.

Campus: Any reason?

Hoodie: I don’t know. It just makes you feel good. I get the feels from it. Good vibe song.

Campus: Who do you look up to musically?

Hoodie: I grew up really loving a lot of east coast hip hop. So everything from Nas and Biggie to A Tribe Called Quest and Outkast. Outkast is from Atlanta, but you know, groups like that definitely inspired me to want to write my own stuff.

Campus: Do you have a favorite place you’ve performed at or gone to?

Hoodie: First time I went overseas it was really cool for me because it felt like this huge stepping stone. To be able to tour all around the U.S. is cool, and that was always amazing, but then I was like “Oh I’m going over to Europe for the first time. I’m going to go play these shows in U.K. or Germany or France.” I was really excited about that.

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