Allegheny continues expanding diversity

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Allegheny continues expanding diversity

Aleäa Reyes, '18, has been working with the rest of residence life to make sure everything is prepared for the incoming freshmen.

Aleäa Reyes, '18, has been working with the rest of residence life to make sure everything is prepared for the incoming freshmen.

Angela Mauroni

Aleäa Reyes, '18, has been working with the rest of residence life to make sure everything is prepared for the incoming freshmen.

Angela Mauroni

Angela Mauroni

Aleäa Reyes, '18, has been working with the rest of residence life to make sure everything is prepared for the incoming freshmen.

Angela Mauroni, News Editor

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The class of 2019 is the most diverse in Allegheny history, according to Sue Stuebner, Allegheny’s executive vice president and chief operating officer.

“There’s a very nice array of students coming in,” said Stuebner.

Allegheny has grown in diversity over the past two years, with 25 percent of this year’s group of students identifying as a person of color as opposed to 21 percent in prior years. 

As well, 60 percent of students have been active in civic engagement and 40 percent have had leadership roles prior to Allegheny. Although the college has not made up for last year’s under enrollment, Stuebner does feel that the incoming class has brought the college closer to their Combinations Strategic 2020 Plan which aims to diversify the campus nationally and internationally, increase scholarships and encourage study away programs. More than 50 percent of freshmen students will be from out of state.

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Although the class of 2019 has not reached previous numbers of enrollment, it has increased in diversity, going from 21 percent of freshmen students identifying as a person of color to 25 percent.

Angela Mauroni
Although the class of 2019 has not reached previous numbers of enrollment, it has increased in diversity, going from 21 percent of freshmen students identifying as a person of color to 25 percent.

“The incoming class really epitomizes Allegheny values,” said Stuebner.

This year’s incoming freshmen will also be participating in more Living-Learning Communities than their predecessors.

LLCs are halls in which students from the same freshmen seminar class reside and learn about a similar subject continuously throughout the year. According to the Allegheny College website, this is meant to strengthen the bond between the students and allow for more in-depth and personal learning of subjects.

According to Jennifer Foxman, the assistant dean of students and director of residence life, the introduction of more LLCs came from a faculty push. While previously only four LLCs were offered, there are now six for Fall of 2015.

Residence Life has been preparing for the new class as well with updated discussion topics, new door decorations and room preparation. According to Foxman, the residence life staff works to improve themselves and the experience for the new students every year.

“We keep raising the standard,” Foxman said. “Every year we try to do a little bit more.”

Resident and community advisor training has been revamped from prior years as well in order to better tend to student needs.

“In the past it’s been more lecture format,” said Andrew Skelly, ’17, the CA in Schultz Hall. “But this year it’s been more interactive and hands-on.”

The RAs and CAs also met with the resource directors on campus, such as Chaplain Jane Ellen Nickell and the Director of the Counseling Center Yvonne Eaton-Stull. Skelly said they are now better prepared to explain and refer their residents to these resources when need be.

The RAs and CAs learned more about Meadville in order to pass on knowledge to their residents. This opportunity will be presented as they do events in town with their residents in honor of The Year of Meadville.

Skelly believes the RAs will be more excited to take their residents to places like Market House Grille and Bicentennial Plaza.

“I think it’s given a better sense of proactiveness,” said Skelly.

Levi Lundell, ’17, an RA in Schultz Hall said he believes these steps have brought the college one step closer to making everyone feel welcome.

“It’s based on building a community,” he said.

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