Nyamu walks against elephant poaching: Wildlife biologist marches from Boston to D.C.

Christina Bryson, Contributing Writer

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Caitie McMekin / The Campus Jim Nyamu, a wildlife biologist, made Allegheny one of his stops between walks in protest against ivory poaching in Africa. His talk, titled “Conserving African Elephants Through Walking and Talking,” was held in Quigley Auditoriam on Thursday.

Caitie McMekin / The Campus
Jim Nyamu, a wildlife biologist, made Allegheny one of his stops between walks in protest against ivory poaching in Africa. His talk, titled “Conserving African Elephants Through Walking and Talking,” was held in Quigley Auditoriam on Thursday.

Poachers killed two elephants in the Tsavo Ecosystem in Kenya on Wednesday August 28.

“I told them to take care of the elephants when I’m gone,” said Jim Nyamu, a wildlife biologist in Kenya.

Nyamu, a Kenyan native, came to Allegheny yesterday to raise awareness about ivory poaching in Africa. His speech “Conserving African Elephants Through Walking and Talking” was held in the Quigley auditorium.

“It’s very hard to tell them ‘I’m a Kenyan and these animals belong to us.’ Some will believe, some will not, but you have to keep walking,” Nyamo said.

Nyamu’s next walk begins Sept. 4, from Boston, Mass., and ends in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 4 for the International March for Elephants, when cities all around the world join the cause. For more information, go to elephantneighborscenter.org or stop by the Market House this Saturday, Aug. 31, in the afternoon, where Nyamu will be giving more information on his cause.

“They think elephants are like avocados,” Nyamu said during his presentation. “You can take avocados from a tree and it still lives, but these are all dead elephants.”

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