Allegheny club sports for students

The Campus will be featuring four club sports in each of the next four issues.

MEAGHAN WILBY, Staff Writer

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“Club sports give folks another opportunity to be physically active,” said Portia Hoeg, Director of Athletics. “It’s a wonderful outlet for people who can’t commit to a varsity sport.”

There are 21 registered clubs at Allegheny College, however only 16 of them are currently active.

The clubs are entirely student run and based on student interest. Each club has a faculty advisor and a student president.

Unlike varsity sports the competitions that each club competes in varies. Some clubs belong to leagues, for others their games depend on whatever they are able to organize. Often teams will compete against schools in the Western PA area and are not limited by NCAA defined classifications.

Cheerleading

The Cheerleading club is about supporting the school and its sports teams according to club captain, Emily Eikey. They currently cheer at football games and the men’s and women’s basketball matches.

The squad is made up of about 20 women with all kinds of experience levels. Anyone can join and they hold a number of tryouts throughout the year: often two in the fall (one at the beginning of the football and then basketball season) and one in the spring.

There is no competitive aspect to the club; their sole purpose is to support the school and its sports teams.

It is  a relatively inexpensive commitment financially: there are two lots of dues that have to be paid plus shoes and some personal items for the uniform. To be part of the squad requires a commitment to two two-hour practices a week as well as any games.

Equestrian

The equestrian club is divided into two divisions. The club is open to anyone of any experience level who wants to try equestrian and a 14-member competitive team.

The competitive team is required to ride at least eight times a semester. They are coached by Halli Bidwell and compete in horse shows at various different schools in the western Pennsylvania area. The members compete in different classes depending on their skill level.

Tournaments are a large time commitment, however there is little financial cost associated with them. The only financial commitment, for both club and team members are lessons, however the club receives a discounted price.

Lessons are held at Brenric Barn and scheduled weekly at various times. They are available for both competitive and noncompetitive members.

Fencing

The fencing club requires no previous experience or any specific time commitment. There is a lot of inexperience within the club said president Patrick Payne.

The club runs over both semesters and they have practices twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. From 6-7 p.m., people with previous experience can come and at 7 p.m. each week, Professor Tomas Nonnenmacher runs lessons for newcomers.

“People are welcome to go along to practice anytime. There are no hard feelings if you try it and don’t come back,” Payne said.

Club members can compete in tournaments if they would like to, however it is not a requirement.  The club attends 1-2 tournaments a semester, and although they haven’t hosted one at Allegheny in a while, they are hoping to host one this year.

Men’s Ice Hockey

The Men’s Ice Hockey club practices twice a week and play on Friday nights. They are coached by Kyle Jones and have recently joined a new league which has helped to reduce travel times.

They play over both semesters and will take anyone who wants to play, however you have to be able to provide your own equipment.

This makes it a large financial commitment if you have never played before. To get all the necessary equipment can cost around $1000, on top of the $300 cost to play that all members are required to pay.

The club has a current roster of 16 people, most of whom have played in High School.

Men’s Lacrosse

The Men’s Lacrosse team is enjoying their first year as an official club.

They practice twice a week on Fridays and Sundays and are working on joining a league but currently just play games that they organize themselves.

There is no current cost and there is equipment available for members to use, however it is recommended that they provide their own stuff.

The roster has about 18-20 people on it and covers a fairly widespread level of experience.

“We enthusiastically accept new people, even if you have never played before…if you are looking for something to do that isn’t a huge time commitment but you can still work out, then lacross is perfect,” Hayden Moyer, ‘17, said.

Men’s Rugby

After coming off a two year winning streak, the men’s rugby team has moved up into the gold division, which is the top league. Despite losing their first two games this year they remain positive about the clubs’ future.

“I’ve been really impressed with what they’ve achieved…they’re on an upward trajectory,” Professor Steven Farrelly-Jackson, faculty adviser, said.

The team practices for two hours, twice a week at Robertson athletics complex and play over both semesters. Their fall semester consists of a competitive seven game season plus play offs and the spring semester is their tournament season.

There is a $40 cost to play and players are required to provide their own boots and mouth guard. There is also the potential for tournament fees in the Spring semester.

Men’s Volleyball

The Men’s volleyball club practice twice a week on tuesdays and only play games during the Spring. Most of their members have played in high school however novices are welcome according to faculty adviser Quinn Wright, women’s assistant volleyball coach.

Although it is a NCAA recognized Division III sport, it is not considered a sport by the North Coast Athletic Conference.

Wright says that being a club sport can have both positive and negative aspects to it. Practices are more laid back than varsity sports however your schedule depends on what you choose and the leadership at the time.

Ski and Snowboard Club

The ski and snowboard club is a recreational club rather than a competitive one. They focus on providing opportunities for students to ski and snowboard during the winter.

Club president Bridgette McCaulley said they recognize how expensive the sport can be so they try to reduce costs to make it affordable on a college student’s budget.

Every year the club organizes one big trip. Over the past few years it has been to Holiday Valley, N.Y. and last year they were able to take 40 students with them. The trip cost $150, which included food, transport, tickets and accommodation for the three days.

They are currently hoping to organize some smaller trips throughout this year as well.

The club doesn’t hold any regular meetings and will send out announcements to their emailing list when a meeting is coming up.

Weightlifting Club

The weightlifting club is currently an emerging club that hopes to be an official club by mid-October says Andre Green, 15,  club president.

The club has emerged from the increased student interest in weightlifting. They plan to meet routinely, hold clinics and provide assistance to anyone looking for help.

The clinics will focus on certain lifts to help people get the most out of their workouts and will be open to anyone who wants to attend.

“It is all about a better, stronger you” Green said..

Women’s Rugby

The women’s rugby club consider themselves to be a sorority without being a sorority.

“It’s the quickest way to make 30 best friends,” Jillian Gallatin, 16, club president, said.

They practice three to four times a week up at Robertson Athletic complex and play their games on Saturdays. They have a competitive season in the fall and a tournament and learning season in the spring where they don’t keep track of score.

They are coached by Brandy Kaputa who they consider more like a teammate than a coach according to Gallatin. Experience levels within the club vary, however most people had never played before and knew nothing about the sport when they joined.

“We’re very accepting of anyone who wants to try rugby” says Gallatin.

Other registered clubs include: Aikedo, Dance, Running, Table Tennis, Ultimate Frisbee and Women’s Colorguard. Field Hockey is an emerging club.

Men’s Lacrosse

The Men’s Lacrosse team is enjoying their first year as an official club.

They practice twice a week on Fridays and Sundays and are working on joining a league but currently just play games that they organize themselves.

There is no current cost and there is equipment available for members to use, however it is recommended that they provide their own stuff.

The roster has about 18-20 people on it and covers a fairly widespread level of experience.

“We enthusiastically accept new people, even if you have never played before…if you are looking for something to do that isn’t a huge time commitment but you can still work out, then lacross is perfect,” Hayden Moyer, ‘17, said.

Men’s Rugby

After coming off a two year winning streak, the men’s rugby team has moved up into the gold division, which is the top league. Despite losing their first two games this year they remain positive about the clubs’ future.

“I’ve been really impressed with what they’ve achieved…they’re on an upward trajectory,” Faculty Adviser Professor Steven Farrelly-Jackson said.

The team practices for two hours, twice a week at Robertson athletics complex and play over both semesters. Their fall semester consists of a competitive seven game season plus play offs and the spring semester is their tournament season.

There is a $40 cost to play and players are required to provide their own cleats and mouth guard. There is also the potential for tournament fees in the spring semester.

Men’s Volleyball

The men’s volleyball club practice twice a week on tuesdays and only play games during the spring. Most of their members have played in high school, however, novices are welcome according to faculty adviser Quinn Wright, women’s assistant volleyball coach.

Although it is a NCAA recognized Division III sport, it is not considered a varsity sport by the North Coast Athletic Conference.

Wright says that being a club sport can have both positive and negative aspects to it. Practices are more laid back than varsity sports however your schedule depends on what you choose and the leadership at the time.

Ski and Snowboard Club

The ski and snowboard club is a recreational club rather than a competitive one. They focus on providing opportunities for students to ski and snowboard during the winter.

Club president Bridgette McCaulley said they recognize how expensive the sport can be so they try to reduce costs to make it affordable on a college student’s budget.

Every year the club organizes one big trip. Over the past few years it has been to Holiday Valley, N.Y. and last year they were able to take 40 students with them. The trip cost $150, which included food, transport, tickets and accommodation for the three days.

They are currently hoping to organize some smaller trips throughout this year as well.

The club doesn’t hold any regular meetings and will send out announcements to their emailing list when a meeting is coming up.

Weightlifting Club

The weightlifting club is currently an emerging club that hopes to be an official club by mid-October says Andre Green, ’15, club president.

The club has emerged from the increased student interest in weightlifting. They plan to meet routinely, hold clinics and provide assistance to anyone looking for help.

The clinics will focus on certain lifts to help people get the most out of their workouts and will be open to anyone who wants to attend.

“It is all about a better, stronger you” Green said.

Women’s Rugby

The women’s rugby club consider themselves to be a sorority without being a sorority.

“It’s the quickest way to make 30 best friends,” Jillian Gallatin, ’16, club president, said.

They practice three to four times a week up at Robertson Athletic complex and play their games on Saturdays. They have a competitive season in the fall and a tournament and learning season in the spring where they don’t keep track of score.

They are coached by Brandy Kaputa who they consider more like a teammate than a coach according to Gallatin. Experience levels within the club vary, however most people had never played before and knew nothing about the sport when they joined.

“We’re very accepting of anyone who wants to try rugby,” Gallatin said.

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